The Problem with Back to School Backpacks

Backpacks for back to school

Back to school shopping for backpacks

“The cute ones are often the worst.” Speaking of backpacks, not kids! Backpacks on the back to school shopping list means more than the making a choice between fabrics and colors. This post is to help ‘unpack’ the problems to be solved in choosing a back to school backpack. Please share you tips on buying the back to school backpacks below.

• Durability is a factor. Is the backpack durable enough to make it through the entire school year?

• Image is a factor too. Will your child make it through the school year without being teased about the backpack?

• Cost is a factor – is there a discount coupon for this item?

Health issues concerning posture and strength are a consideration in chosing the backpack.

• Predictability is another issue in shopping. Since backpacks are usually purchased before the first day of school, it’s a little difficult to predict which backpack will suffice.

The Healthy Backpack

More and more, we are hearing that ‘right’ backpack is the one that helps to maintain a child’s good posture and health. Recent articles promote the following features of a ‘healthy’ backpack

• Sturdy construction
• Wide straps
• Compartments to equally distribute items
• Backpack should not be more than 20% of child’s weight

These backpacks don’t have to be expensive. If you think they are, think of the money you’ll save on chiropractic care, physical therapy and aspirin, if you don’t get one. But, to be a savvy shopper, all of the options should be considered for your child’s needs and the budget.

The Rolly Backpack

Some parents opt for the rolly backpack as the best choice. Most of the school aged children I know have heavy schedules and heavy textbooks. The wheels are ideal! Turns out having a rolly bag can actually be the cause of stress at school for older children.

• “That’s more like luggage than a school bag.”

• “If you still have a rolly bag in the fifth grade, you’ll never be ‘normal.’”

• “You’re the one who needs it.”

It was explained to me by a few tweens and teens that rolly bags can actually cause of accidents in the school hallways – kids trip over the wheels, and the one with the rolly bag has to know not to run the wheels into other hallway pedestrians.

As the children grow, they will outgrow “what works”, that’s for sure!

But at every age, we want young people to have positive learning experiences at school. Getting the right backpack is just the beginning. Here’s to a good beginning – have a great school year!

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You are invited to sample a free chapter of “LEMONADE SOLD OUT” here. It’s the story of an elementary school entrepreneur who figures out a system that helps everyone win!

About candi sparks

Candi Sparks is a fully licensed financial professional and a Brooklyn mother of two. She works with private clients, business owners, the NYC Department of Education, faith based, non profit and community organizations on financial education and implementing financial strategies for success. Events are fun, interactive and solid financial information. Sparks Fly, financial literacy for YOU(th) Learn more so you can live more! toll free: 866.556.2432
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2 Responses to The Problem with Back to School Backpacks

  1. Ron says:

    Candi has amazing advice with these topics, just ask your own tweens, teens, and pre-teens they will tell you she is “dead on” with this, this is not just good advice for kids adults should take her tips as well. Great Job, thanks for the advice.

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